How To Watermark Photos: Pros, Cons and Tips for Watermarking

If you look around online, you’ll notice that a lot of people watermark photos on their websites. Professional photographers, bloggers, businesses and individuals choose to add a watermark to their pictures. But is this something you should be doing?

Watermarking has been around for ages. You might even remember seeing printed photos with the word COPY or something similar all over it. Photographers might still do this when giving customers prints from which they can select and order their photos.

In the digital age, watermarking is still around. It may take the form of a logo, text or a symbol (like the copyright icon), which is superimposed over a photo or placed in the border around a photo.

Should You Watermark Photos?

There are a number of good reasons to watermark photos on your site. A watermark can be used as a form of copyright, and it can help prevent people from using an image as their own or without your permission.

It has also become a way of signing an image. A watermark is similar to a digital signature, and through this people can see who took the photo. In this way, you can build your reputation as a photographer, or that of your blog.

But while watermarking has its uses, its debatable as to whether it should be used. Placing a watermark on your photo can be distracting, even potentially harmful. Depending on where the watermark is placed, and how large it is, you can change the focus (and effectiveness) of the image.

Using a watermark isn’t a foolproof way to prevent others from using your photo. It’s easy enough to remove the watermark, especially if it’s small or placed in a corner or border of the image. You can overlay a semi-transparent watermark image over your entire photo, making it difficult to remove. But this is likely to detract from the image.

Adding a watermark can also take time. If you change your logo, you’ll need to change the watermarks on older images, which will add to this. Depending on the method you use, or the software, it could also cost you money.

How To Add A Watermark

If you do decide to use a watermark, there are several simple ways to add one. You can simply add text to your image, such as ‘Copyright FooPlugins 2018’. Any photo editor will enable you to do this. It’s advisable to keep the text small, but legible, and place it vertically on the side of your image. Here’s an example – look in the top right hand corner.

Watermark photos with text in corner

You can also use specific software to watermark photos. You can use text, your signature, or a logo, and use your chosen software to add this to your images. Here are some options to get you started:

If you don’t want to use a watermark, but still want to keep track of whether your images are being used without your permission, there are ways to do this. You can use one of these software solutions, or simply add your image to Google Image and search for it.

Tips For Using a Watermark

If you do decide to use a watermark for your images, then there are some things you should do, and others you should avoid. To begin with, make the watermark the right size. Too big and it will distract from the image. Too small and no one will see it.

It also needs to be legible. You may choose to use your signature, but unless people can read it, it won’t be particularly useful. If you’re using text, try for something interesting or unusual, but that can still be easily read.

Avoid placing your watermark over the entire photo. Rather place it in a corner or in the border. Wherever it goes, it shouldn’t be a distraction.

You don’t need to watermark all of your images. Rather save it for the really amazing photos, the ones you’ve spent time composing, and the ones that others are likely to want for themselves.

Remember, your images can make (or break) your website, so do what works for you. Regardless of whether you watermark your photos or not, you can always add your copyright info to the description or caption of your images. FooGallery also allows you to add html.

Find out more about FooGallery here.

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